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MacDill Airman Charged with Second Degree Murder

A 22-year-old airman first class, stationed at MacDill Air Force Base, has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of her boyfriend. Last weekend, officers responded to the Coves of Brighton Bay apartment complex after receiving a 911 call from airman Rashida Williams. In the call, she allegedly said that she had just stabbed her boyfriend.

Wayne Charles-Marion Drummer was found dead inside the apartment with a stab wound to the chest, according to police reports. Drummer is a civilian.

The couple had allegedly been arguing about money prior to the stabbing. Police found a knife they believe Williams used to stab Drummer in the kitchen sink.

According to the police report, Drummer had moved in with Williams about a week ago. Both had previously resided in Chicago.

Williams is an airman first class and is assigned to the 6th Medical Group at MacDill, according to Capt. Regina Gillis, spokeswoman for the 6th Air Mobility Wing. The base was cooperating with St. Petersburg police in their investigation of the crime. It is unknown whether military investigators will conduct their own follow-up investigation or if Williams faces disciplinary action, though both seem likely.

Williams was charged with second-degree murder, and is being held in a Pinellas County jail with no bail.

A person is guilty of second-degree murder in Florida if he kills someone “by any act imminently dangerous to another and evincing a depraved mind regardless of human life, although without any premeditated design to effect the death of any particular individual”. A conviction carries a sentence of up to 15 years in prison.

Prosecutors do not have to prove the defendant actually intended to cause death for conviction of second-degree murder. Contrast this to the “premeditated design to kill” element required to find someone guilty of first-degree murder. Premeditated means that there was a conscious decision to kill. The decision must be present in the accused’s mind at the time the act was committed but doesn’t necessarily require a long thought-process or planning period. This is not the case for a second-degree murder conviction.

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