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How can you defend drug manufacturing charges?

On Behalf of | Oct 4, 2021 | Drug Charges

Drug crimes are serious offenses that can have severe legal consequences.

If you face manufacturing charges, it is essential to understand the laws, possible penalties, and your rights.

What constitutes a drug manufacturing charge in Florida?

Manufacturing charges involve preparing, converting, producing or creating any controlled substance in quantities above personal use. Any unlicensed production of restricted drugs is illegal. Cultivating plants, delivering or supplying materials needed for making these substances may also garner manufacturing charges.

Intent to manufacture is also against the law. You may face a drug manufacturing charge if you have the chemicals or tools necessary to produce illegal substances in your possession. Persons who knowingly facilitate the production of drugs can also face legal charges.

What are the potential penalties for drug manufacturing?

You could face fines ranging from $1,000 to $10,000 and up to 30 years in jail, depending on your situation. Various factors affect your possible sentence:

  • The schedule type of the substance
  • The substance amount in your possession
  • The intent to deliver to a minor
  • The proximity of your manufacture charge to public parks, schools or churches

What defense do you have against drug charges?

The state needs to prove that you intended to manufacture a controlled substance. It is crucial to connect with an experienced attorney to assist with your legal defense. The circumstances of your charges and arrest are unique.

  • Did you know the drugs were on your property or in your vehicle?
  • Were you aware of your tenant’s drug manufacturing activity?
  • Did police violate your rights during the search and seizure?
  • Did law enforcement coerce you to deliver drugs?

Thorough knowledge of Florida laws and court procedures is necessary to avoid the potentially life-altering consequences of your situation.

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