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Facing murder charges? Capital punishment could be on the table

Capital crimes are terrifying in Florida because if you are caught and convicted, you could face the death penalty. No one deserves to be faced with that kind of punishment.

Fortunately, not all murders are punishable by death. In fact, the law does require aggravating factors to be present, such as previously being convicted of a felony or being on probation at the time of the murder. There are many exceptions to capital punishment, so your attorney will do what they can to reduce the chances that this would be a potential penalty in your case.

Many states in the U.S. no longer use capital punishment. Why does Florida?

The truth is that most states do allow for capital punishment in severe or extreme cases. It’s only used for the most serious crimes, so if you’re facing it, you should be aware that the prosecution believes that you’ve done something particularly heinous. Fortunately, having a good defense can help reduce the likelihood that capital punishment will be used or even presented as an option.

All states in the U.S. create their own laws regarding capital punishment. Florida has some differences in what they allow versus what other states allow, too. For example, Florida will not allow the execution of someone who is found to be insane or someone who is pregnant so long as the condition is still present. Interestingly, Florida does sometimes allow capital punishment in capital drug trafficking cases, unlike some other states.

If you’re facing charges for murder, don’t wait to build a defense. It could help you avoid serious, and potentially life-threatening, penalties.

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