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Woman faces prison after committing fraud against government

The last thing anyone should do is try to defraud the government. The penalties are severe, and it’s extremely difficult to defend against the government’s prosecution team. Unfortunately, those who choose to defraud the government aren’t usually considering the impact their actions could have if they’re caught.

A woman from Punta Gorda is facing time in federal prison today for committing wire fraud against the United States Government. According to the news report, the woman, 60, will go to prison for six months as a result of committing wire fraud against Fannie Mae, also known as the Federal National Mortgage Association.

She will also have to serve three years of supervised release following the prison sentence. She will pay restitution amounting to approximately $34,000 and have to participate in 100 hours of community service. She was convicted for fraudulent invoices, which she issued to Fannie Mae after using her own preservation services company to inflate invoices or create invoices for work that never occurred.

It is against the law to submit fraudulent invoices to anyone, let alone a government program. However, there is help for those who have committed a crime such as this one. The good news for people in situations like this is that there is a chance to protect and defend yourself. A strong defense can make a difference in the penalties you could face. You may be able to negotiate a sentence that will help you avoid prison or harsh fines, so you can get back to your life more quickly than if you don’t protect your interests.

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